6 Online Fashion Brands Making Serious Style From Rubbish

Rubbish is usually viewed as something pretty negative but actually after discovering some innovative online fashion brands that are breaking new design ground and become some of the most exciting pioneers that the fashion industry has seen, I think I am starting to see it as something pretty cool!

Here are 6 fab online fashion brands making serious style from rubbish!

The Plastic Bottles

Timberland Earthkeepers Trenton Tall Boot

Timberland are a big offline and online fashion brand using serious amounts of rubbish to make their clothes. I was pretty astounded to learn that literally millions of disgarded plastic water and soda bottles are used to make Timberland Earthkeepers products from the linings to laces, uppers and even faux shearling and faux fur. Timberland haven’t just used the old bottles as they are, they have had to be pretty to clever about it to make sure that the resulting products lived up to their high style and performance standards for their outdoorsy clothes. ReCanvas™ fabric is just one of their clever little innovations, it is a material with the look and feel of cotton canvas that’s made from 100% recycled PET.

The Old Fire Hoses

Elvis & Kresse

Old fire hoses might seem pretty useless but design duo Elvis & Kresse make good use of them along with a range of other waste but reengineering them into some very stylish accessories. Just recently online fashion brand Elvis and Kresse announced that there bags will be available through the Donna Karan shop in New York as part of a long term collaboration to promote their shared goals of consious consumerism.

Rubber Inner Tubes

Reclaim Bags

Reclaim Bags was founded by Sophie Postma whilst studying Fashion and Innovation at Leeds college of Art. Old recycled rubber inner tubes are turned into really cool bags which are sold by the mega online fashion retailer ASOS as well as www.wears-london.co.uk.

Bottletops

Bottletop bag

When it comes to intelligent design, the Bottletop idea is hard to beat. Take a load of old can ring pulls, then create work for empoverished people around the world as they use an intricate method of crocheting to make the ring pulls into fab and funky metallic bags. Not surprisingly the Bottletop brand was conceived by, Cameron Saul after being inspired by a bag made of bottle tops in Uganda, along with his father Roger, the founder of luxury brand Mulberry.

Fishing nets and carpets

Online Fashion - Auria Swimwear

Diana Auria launched her swimwear brand Auria London after completing a contour degree at London College of Fashion in 2012. Her swimwear has been sold at some pretty hip online fashion retailers including Yoox, Fashion Art Music and Urban Outfitters. The amazing fabric used to make the swimming cozzies and bikinis at Auria London is completely unrecognisable as fishing nets and carpets but that is what it is actually made from. The last collection was a collab with illustrator Margot Bowman featuring a fun cloud print.

Fashion Industry Waste 

From Somewhere

Surplus fabrics and offcuts from design houses could be destined for landfill if it wasn’t for the pioneering fashion label From Somewhere which was started in 1997 by Orsola de Castro and Filippo Ricci. The pair have worked on a number of high profile collaborations incuding Topshop and Speedo. The philosophy of the label is to create fashion-forward design; bringing quality and craftsmanship to “exquisite rubbish.” Not only can customers shop From Somewhere website for ready to wear but they can also order items that are made to order from the online fashion trunk sales on the site.

What do you think seriously stylish or a load of old rubbish? how about both!

With warmest wishes

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